The University of Western Australia

UWA Staff Profile

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Assoc/Prof David Barrie

Associate Professor
History

Contact details
Address
History
The University of Western Australia (M208)
35 Stirling Highway
CRAWLEY WA 6009
Australia
Phone
+61 8 6488 3401
Fax
+61 8 6488 1069
Email
david.barrie@uwa.edu.au
Location
Room 2.09, Arts Building, Perth campus
Qualifications
BA Stir., PhD Strath.
Biography
I am Associate Professor of History, specialising in the history of crime, policing, punishment and marriage in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain. I established, and edit, the book series Palgrave Histories of Policing, Punishment and Justice. My key teaching interests include criminal justice history, British history, and the history of leisure and sport. As chief investigator (project leader), I have attracted $430,000 in competitive research income, including grants from the Australian Research Council, the Economic and Social Research Council (UK) and the Carnegie Trust (UK). My co-authored (with Susan Broomhall) two-volume monograph, Police Courts in Nineteenth-Century Scotland (Ashgate) won the 2017 Frank Watson prize for best book in Scottish history. My first monograph, Police in the Age of Improvement: Police Development and the Civic Tradition in Scotland, 1775-1865 (Willan Publishing, 2008/Routledge, 2012) was awarded ‘best first book’ in Scottish history by the Frank Watson Book Prize Committee.

Key research
My research interests include: eighteenth- and nineteenth-century criminal justice history, marriage affinity, British history and Scottish history; leisure and recreation; urban history; and the history of masculinity.
Publications
Authored Books:
•David G. Barrie, Sin, Sanctity and the Sister-in-Law: Marriage with a Deceased Wife’s Sister in the Nineteenth Century (Routledge, 2018), pp.1-224.
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, Police Courts in Nineteenth-Century Scotland. Volume 1: Magistrates, Media and the Masses (Ashgate, 2014), pp. 1-534. 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, Police Courts in Nineteenth-Century Scotland. Volume II: Boundaries, Behaviours and Bodies (Ashgate, 2014), pp. 1-296. 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie, Police in the Age of Improvement. Police Development and the Civic Tradition in Scotland, 1775-1865 (Willan Publishing, 2008; re-published in paperback by Routledge, 2012), pp. 1-307.

Edited Books:
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, eds, A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700-2010 (Routledge, 2012), pp. 1-303. 50% Contribution.

Refereed Journal Articles:
•David G. Barrie, ‘Policing Marriage under the Tree of Despotism: The Struggle over Marital, Civic and Police-Judicial Relations in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Edinburgh’, The Scottish Historical Review, 95:1 (Edinburgh University Press, 2016), pp. 57-87.
•David G. Barrie, ‘The Media as a Police and Judicial Resource: Police Courts and the Printed Word in Scotland, c.1800-1850’, Cultural and Social History, 12:3 (Bloomsbury, 2015), pp. 385-410.
•David Barrie, ‘Trial by Media: Naming and Shaming in Nineteenth-Century Scotland’, Journal of British Studies, 54:1 (Cambridge University Press, 2015), pp. 349-76.
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, ‘Public Men, Private Interests? The Development, Structure and Practice of Police Courts in Scotland, 1800 to 1833', Continuity and Change, 27:1 (Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 83-123. 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Anglicisation and Autonomy: Scottish Policing, Governance and the State, 1833 to 1885’, Law and History Review Volume 30 (Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 449-94.
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, ‘The Changing of the Guard: Policing and Masculinity in Enlightenment Scotland’, Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 28:1 (University of Western Australia Press, 2011), pp. 65-90. 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie, ‘A Typology of British Police: Locating the Scottish Municipal Police Model in its British Context, 1800-1835’, British Journal of Criminology, Volume 50, No.2 (Oxford University Press, March, 2010), pp. 259-277.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Police in Civil Society: Police, Enlightenment and Civic Virtue in Scotland, 1780-1833’, Urban History, Volume 37:1 (Cambridge University Press, May, 2010), pp. 45-65.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Nineteenth-Century Scottish Police Records and their Value for the Historian’, Scottish Archives: The Journal of the Scottish Records Association (Edinburgh University Press, Volume 16, 2010), pp. 51-69.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Patrick Colquhoun, the Scottish Enlightenment and Police Reform in Glasgow in the Late Eighteenth Century’, Crime, Histoire & Sociétés/Crime, History & Societies, 12:2 (Published by the International Association for the History of Crime and Criminal Justice, Paris, 2008), pp.59-79.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Epoch-Making Beginnings to Lingering Death: The Struggle for Control of the Glasgow Police Commission, 1833-46’, Scottish Historical Review, Volume LXXXVI, 2: No. 222 (Edinburgh University Press, October 2007), pp.253-277.

Book Chapters:
•David G. Barrie and Joanne McEwan, ‘Sedition, the High Court and Print Culture in Late Eighteenth-century Edinburgh’, in Mike Davis, ed., Political Trials in Britain, Canada and America during the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (Palgrave, 2017). 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Policing and Print, c.1800-1914: British and European Perspectives’, in Mark Finnane (ed.), A Cultural History of Crime and Punishment in the Age of Empire (Bloomsbury, London, 2018).
•David G. Barrie, ‘Policing Before the Police in the Eighteenth Century: British and European Perspectives’, in Anja Johansen and Paul Knepper (eds), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Crime and Criminal Justice (Oxford, 2016), pp. 435-55.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Policing in Britain, 1750-1829’, in Gerben Bruinsma and David Weisburd (eds), Encyclopaedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Volume 8: Police and Law Enforcement (Springer, New York: 2014), pp. 3765-3777.
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, ‘Introduction’, in David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, eds, A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700-2010 (Routledge, 2012), pp. 1-33. 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, ‘Making Men: Media, Magistrates and the Representation of Masculinity in Scottish Police Courts, 1800-1835’, in David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, eds, A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700-2010 (Routledge, 2012), pp. 72-101. 50% Contribution. (Assisted by DP130104804, 2012-15).
•David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall, ‘Policing Bodies in Urban Scotland, 1780-1850,’ in Susan Broomhall and Jacqueline Van Gent, eds, Governing Masculinities: Regulating Selves and Others in the Early Modern Period (Ashgate, 2011), pp. 263-82. 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Urban Order in Georgian Dundee, c.1770-1820’, in C.A. MacKean, B. Harris and Chris Whatley eds, Dundee: From Renaissance to Enlightenment (Dundee University Press, 2009), pp. 216-242.

Companion Entries:
•David G. Barrie, ‘Police in Nineteenth-Century Scotland’, in Jo Turner, Paul Taylor, Karen Corteen, & Sharon Morley (eds), A Companion to Crime and Criminal Justice History for Policy Press (2017). 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie and Joanne McEwan, ‘The Scottish Courts in the Nineteenth-Century’, in Jo Turner, Paul Taylor, Karen Corteen, & Sharon Morley (eds), A Companion to Crime and Criminal Justice History for Policy Press (2017). 50% Contribution.
•David G. Barrie, ‘Patrick Colquhoun’, in Jo Turner, Paul Taylor, Karen Corteen, & Sharon Morley (eds), A Companion to Crime and Criminal Justice History for Policy Press (2017).


Invited Book Reviews:
•Rosalind Crone, Violent Victorians. Popular Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century London (Manchester University Press, 2012), Australian Journal of Politics and History, Volume 59/3 (2013.
•Barry Godfrey and David Cox, Policing the Factory: Theft, Private Policing and the Law in Modern England (Bloomsbury, 2013), Journal of British Studies, Volume 53/1 (2014)
Roles, responsibilities and expertise
Associate Professor/Researcher with expertise in nineteenth-century urban history, Scottish history and criminal justice history.
Future research
Media representations of police and judicial practices; marriage affinity.
Funding received
As chief investigator, I have attracted $430,000 in competitive research income, including grants from the Economic and Social Research Council (UK), the Carnegie Trust (UK), and the Australian Research Council. Externally-funded grants awarded include:

•2013 to 2015: $155,000 from the Australian Research Council for project entitled ‘Prosecution, Punishment and the Printed Word in Enlightenment Scotland, c.1747-1815’ (with partner investigator Professor Robert B. Shoemaker). Reference: DP130104804.
•2006 to 2007: £62,724 (or at the time of the award, 2.45 currency ratio, of $153,673) from the Economic and Social Research Council in the UK for a project entitled ‘The Origins and Development of Police in Scotland and its Impact upon Urban Governance, 1799-1859’ (Reference: RES-000-22-1758).
•1997 to 2000: Postgraduate Studentship from the Economic and Social Research Council, UK (R00429734381). Approximately $25,000 per year.

Competitive university awards include:
•2013: $17,400 from The University of Western Australia (Teaching Relief Award).
•2010: $30,000 from The University of Western Australia (Research Development Award).
Industrial relevance
Police governance and accountability
Honours and awards
•Winner of the Frank Watson book prize (2017) for best book in Scottish History: Police Courts in Nineteenth-Century Scotland, two volumes, with Susan Broomhall (Ashgate, 2014).
•Winner of Frank Watson book prize (2009) for best first book in Scottish History: Police in the Age of Improvement. Police Development and the Civic Tradition in Scotland, 1775-1865 (Willan Publishing, 2008; re-published in paperback by Routledge, 2012), pp.1-307.
•Nominated for UWA Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Teaching Awards in 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2013.
Previous positions
January 2004 to July 2007:
•Lecturer/Researcher in History and Criminology, School of Law and Social Sciences, Division of History and Division of Law, Glasgow Caledonian University.

Before then, I held a number of part-time teaching contracts at different universities.
Teaching
Undergraduate Units:
•HIST1002: 'The Making of the Modern World, 1789-2000'
•HIST2011 ‘From “Glorious Revolution” to Industrial Revolution: Making Britain 1688–1888’
•HIST3007 ‘Crime and Punishment in Britain 1600–1900’

Honours:
•HIST: Nationalism and History
•HIST: The History of Sport and Celebrity

Awarded Doctoral Theses Supervised:
•Ben Sacks, “'Purely of their own manufacture': The adoption and appropriation of cricket in Samoa, c. 1879-1939 (2017) (with Jeremy Martens, principal supervisor)
•Anita Fairney, ‘Jacobite Scotswomen’s Roles, Identities and Agency in Scottish Politics, 1688-1788’ (2016)
•Chris Owen, ‘“Weather Hot, Flies…” Police in the Kimberley District, 1883-1905’ (2014) (with Charlie Fox and Andrea Gaynor)
•Margaret Dorey, ‘“Poison in the pot”: English concerns about food purity and regulation c. 1500-1800’ (2011) (with Stephanie Tarbin and Phillipa Maddern)

Current PhD Supervision:
•Kelly-Ann Couzens, ‘Medicine on Trial: A Critical Analysis of Medical Testimony and Medical Expertise in the Scottish High Court of Justiciary, c.1820s-c.1890s’ (with Catherine Kelly).
•Paul Nuckley, ‘Representations of the Devil in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century England and Scotland’.

Current external positions
Editor, Palgrave Histories of Policing, Punishment and Justice
Current projects
The Scottish High Court in the eighteenth and early nineteenth-centuries; media representations of policing; marriage with a deceased wife’s sister.
Research profile
Research profile and publications
 

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Last updated:
Tuesday, 3 November, 2015 2:39 PM